The Relationship Between Sleep and Interior Design

You might think your design choices have little to no impact on how well you sleep, but evidence suggests this isn’t the case. When designing a room, there are three C’s to keep in mind to help yourself or someone else get a good night’s sleep: color, clutter, and comfort.

COLOR
Believe it or not, the colors you pick for a room can have a huge impact on sleep. Too much of a high-impact color in a room can affect someone’s sleep cycle. Travelodge found that blue was the best color for helping someone get a good night’s sleep, but there are other colors that also work well, including yellow, green, silver, and orange. These colors have been found to aid in getting a good night’s rest—something we could all use more of.

While certain colors can help you sleep, other colors have the opposite effect. Colors that are too vibrant can lead to distractions at bedtime, while colors that are too dark can make a room seem more depressive. Colors to avoid include brown, gray, gold, purple, and red.

Colors can also affect more than just sleep. For instance, research shows that people with green bedrooms are more likely to wake up feeling upbeat, while those with orange bedrooms experience fewer issues with indigestion.

CLUTTER
Make sure to leave enough space for some living. Clutter can easily increase stress and anxiety levels. Before going to sleep, tidy up the space around your bed. Tuck away items that might cause you to think about tomorrow’s to-do list: stacks of papers, your laptop, and even your phone.

If you’re doing renovations or redecorations, try adding curtains or doors to your storage areas so that whoever is sleeping in the room doesn’t have to look at the clutter. It will do wonders for their sleep.

COMFORT
Minimalism is great, but comfort is key in any design scheme. Make sure you have enough pillows—comfortable pillows, not just decorative throw pieces—to actually get a good night’s rest. Make sure the bed is comfortable and accommodates any needs, such as the need for a firm or soft mattress.

Samantha Kent is a researcher for SleepHelp.org


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"While certain colors can help you sleep, other colors have the opposite effect."